Dental Bridges

Dental bridges are prosthetic devices used by dentists and orthodontists to cover spaces created by one or more missing teeth.

Dental Bridges

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The Skinny


Average Recovery

1 weeks

Permanence

Temporary

Application

Temporary Wearable Device

Surgical

No

Cost

$1500 - $2000

The Specifics


What is a dental bridge?

Dental bridges are prosthetic devices used by dentists and orthodontists to cover spaces created by one or more missing teeth. They are permanently cemented to surrounding teeth or dental implants. Commonly used with dental crowns, bridges can add strength to damaged teeth. They can also enhance tooth alignment, occlusion, shape, and appearance.

The Anatomy of the Tooth

Tooth Anatomy Cross Section Illustration

The procedure for getting dental bridges typically involves two separate appointments with a dentist. During the first appointment, the teeth that the bridge will be cemented on are prepared. This is done by reshaping their contours and removing some of their enamel. Doing this allows room for dental crowns to be placed, which can then be used to anchor the bridge. Then, impressions of the teeth are made and sent to the dental lab where the bridge will be made.

The dentist will provide a temporary bridge to wear to protect exposed teeth and gums while the permanent bridge is being made in the lab. During the next visit, the temporary bridge will be removed and the new metal or porcelain dental bridge will be placed in the mouth to ensure a proper fit. Subsequent visits are typically needed to continue to modify the fit of the bridge.

What cosmetic concerns does a dental bridge procedure treat?

  1. Damaged Teeth & Gums: The prosthetic devices are used to cover spaces by one or more missing teeth, enhance tooth alignment, or strengthen teeth.

Who is the ideal candidate for a dental bridge procedure?

The ideal candidate for dental bridges is missing one or more teeth, has good overall oral health, as well as good gum health with no signs of gum disease or periodontal disease. Dental bridges are not recommended for patients under the age of 16 or for patients with poor dental health whose teeth cannot support the bridge.

What is the average recovery associated with a dental bridge procedure?

Recovery time after a dental bridge procedure can vary depending on what device is used to anchor the bridge in place. If a dental crown is utilized, recovery will be much quicker, generally not lasting longer than one day. If implants are needed to secure the bridge, recovery time may last upwards of one week.

What are the potential side effects of a dental bridge procedure?

Side effects from dental bridges may include tooth sensitivity, gum irritation, speech difficulties, temporary production of excess saliva, and increased risk for tooth decay of abutment teeth.

What can someone expect from the results of a dental bridge procedure?

Dental bridges can last five to 15 years. With good oral hygiene and regular checkups, it is not unusual for the lifespan of a fixed bridge to be over 10 years.

What is the average cost of a dental bridge procedure?


A dental bridge procedure can cost anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000 per tooth. The actual cost of a dental bridge is dependent upon location, dentist, and length and involvement of the procedure.

Pros

Improved smileFix missing teeth

Cons

Will eventually need to be replaced

Invasiveness Score

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Invasiveness is graded based on factors such as anesthesia practices, incisions, and recovery notes common to this procedure.

What to Expect


Dental bridges are prosthetic devices used by dentists and orthodontists to cover spaces created by one or more missing teeth. Here is a quick guide for what to expect before, during, and after dental bridges.

The Takeaway


Dental bridges are a minimally invasive, outpatient dental procedure to restore the health, function, and appearance of teeth.

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Source List

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AEDIT uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Francesco Cairo Periodontal plastic surgery of gingival recessions at single and multiple teeth PubMed.gov; 2017-10-02
  2. Medline Plus Malocclusion of Teeth MedlinePlus.gov
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